Ballet Class Policies

Dress Code

GIRLS 6+

Color-coded leotards (dependent on ballet level), pink footed tights (worn underneath the leotard), and pink ballet shoes. Sports bras may be worn under the leotard as long as they are not distracting (ie, no decorative straps across the back, bright colors/designs).  A tan sports bra with clear straps is suggested to maintain the lines of the leotard. Alternately, a bra the same color and shade as the leo color may be worn.

Level 1 grape

Level 2 royal blue

Level 3 black cherry

Level 4 navy

Level 5 black

Dancers are to wear their level ballet color to all ballet classes, even if they are stepping into a mixed level class or a lower level class (as makeup/extra class). This helps the instructors to be aware of the level of each individual dancer in the class, enabling them to give each dancer the best class possible.

Upon receiving their ballet placement, students will be measured and correct leo ordered through the front desk/office. Youth sized leotards are $25 each and adult sized leotards are $30 each. If the leotard does not arrive by the first week of fall classes, dancers will be asked to wear a solid color leotard to class until it does arrive.

Hair: Should be worn in a clean and neat bun, taking care to ensure that dancer’s hair is out of the face/eyes, is secure and will not come undone in the middle of class.

Jewelry: Only stud earrings will be allowed; no other jewelry should be worn.

 

BOYS

White, fitted t-shirt with black leggings/joggers, white socks and black ballet shoes. Hair should be worn out of the face and eyes.

 

DRESS CODE VIOLATIONS (including incorrect leotard color)

1st offense – Dancer will be allowed to take class but will be sent home with a note

2nd offense –  Dancer will be allowed to take class but will be sent home with a note, informing the parent(s) that the next violation will be marked as an absence.

3rd offense- Dancer will not be allowed to take class, and will be marked absent, but will still be asked to stay and observe class and take notes.

All violations will be tracked through their Studio Director account, and will reset in January and August.

Levels

Our ballet levels are designed to have clarity and distinction in regard to dancers’ training and progress for our dance classes ages 6+ (Level 1-5). Although sometimes this may change the name/number of our current dancers’ level placement, this does not mean that they have been moved down, just that we are re-labeling or shifting the sequence so we may be more specific, have a better progression, more room to grow, and the opportunity to create higher levels as our dancers continue to increase their comprehension and ability.

The required classes for each level vary, and are intended to maintain the current level of the dancer. If the dancer wishes to progress further in ballet (move up in the levels), dancers should consider taking additional ballet classes or privates with one of the ballet instructors. Excessive absences can/will result in a dancer being moved to a lower level. If a dancer wishes to take a mixed level class with the next highest level (example: the dancer is a L3 but would like to take the L3/L4 ballet class), the dancer must have completed 1 year in the lower level class (L3) to be considered for instructor approval to participate in the higher leveled class (L3/L4).

Based on your placed ballet level, all dancers are required to be enrolled and attend a certain number of classes per week. Failure to meet these requirements puts the dancer in jeopardy of being moved down a level. Below are the requirements for the levels:

Level 1 dancers: enrolled in (1) 1 hour class per week

Level 2 dancers: enrolled in (1) 1/1.5 hour class per week

Level 3 dancers: enrolled in (2) 1.5 hour classes per week

Level 4 & 5 dancers: enrolled in (3) 1.5 hour classes per week. 1 hour of ballet (only the third class) can be substituted with a Body Conditioning & Skill Building class.

If a dancer wishes to progress further in ballet (move up in the levels), he/she should consider taking additional ballet classes or privates with one of the ballet instructors.

Evaluations

Formal evaluations are conducted at the end of May in ballet classes, and evaluation classes are available mid-August and early January for students joining mid-year.

Teachers may request a dancer move levels at any time. If a level change is requested by the teacher, the parents will be contacted with a more detailed explanation. If a dancer would like to be considered to move levels (up or down), he/she can request a private evaluation at any time. Dancers new to the studio can pick up a ‘Class Placement Evaluation’ card in the office and drop into a ballet class to be evaluated.

Pointe/Pre-Pointe

Students will be advised of their pointe/pre-pointe levels with the evaluation results in April/May. They must have instructor approval to move into pointe or pre-pointe classes.

No student will be allowed to take a pointe/ pre-pointe class without taking the (directly) preceding ballet class THAT DAY.

Class Etiquette
  • Dancers should wait in the common areas to be invited into the classroom.
  • If a dancer arrives late, he/she will need to check into the office.
  • No dancer can join class after the 15 minute (late) mark. If they arrive 15 minutes after class has started, they will have to sit out, take notes, and make up the class at a later date.
  • No food, drinks (other than water in a self-sealing water bottle), or gum are allowed in the studio.
  • No hanging, climbing, sitting, or leaning on the barre(s).
  • Do not use the barre as a hanging rack for clothes/bags.
  • No cell phones – make sure they are off or on silent/airplane mode.
  • Ask permission before leaving class for any reason.
  • If you must leave early from class, please inform your instructor before class begins and politely dismiss yourself when needed.
  • No talking during class, unless asking the instructor a question or responding to a question the instructor asked.
  • Respect your classmates. If you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.
  • If you are injured, inform your instructor before class begins. If you must sit out, bring a notebook and pen to take notes throughout the class. If a dancer chooses to sit due to injury, he/she will not be allowed to return to dancing in class until the doctor clears the dancer to rejoin the class (this is to prevent any further injuries).
  • No combinations are “optional”
  • Raise your hand to ask questions, and waited to be called on.
  • Dancers should follow proper ballet etiquette throughout the class.
  • Dancers should thank their teacher at the end of class.
Ballet Newsletter Archive

1/16/19
Hello Ballet Families!

Attention L4 Dancers! We will no longer accept the Hunter Green ballet leotards that were previously L4 beginning in August 2019. Please keep this in mind when purchasing new leotards.

Below is information that we think is essential for all dancers, please take a moment to read through!

Why taking lower level ballet classes is essential to progressing in ballet

It is natural for driven dancers and their parents to wish to move up levels quickly.  There is a positive and natural urge to dance in higher levels and participate in classes that are challenging.  It is important to tread this line carefully, however, when it comes to ballet training. Without the correct base technique and strength, taking classes that are too challenging can become a detriment to a dancer’s progress.  That is not to say that taking appropriate and higher level classes isn’t advantageous, just that it is important to continuously be honing in on base technique and strength.

Leveling in a ballet environment is extremely different from progressing from one grade to another in school.  There are implications in that scenario that are not true in ballet. While it can be frustrating as a dancer or parent to hear that it’s not time to move up yet, it is always in the student’s best interest to remain at the appropriate level, as decided by their teachers and program, before jumping into more advanced classes.

For students limited on time and taking many genres of dance- perhaps without the goal of pursuing ballet professionally- it is easy to let ballet classes fall by the wayside.  It is helpful to remember that progress in ballet is progress in many forms of dance, as ballet is the foundation for all types of movement.

Ballet training is a process…it is slow and requires years of repetition.  It requires consistent attendance in class and being present while in class. It is not a “step” or “trick” that can be mastered over a semester or year.  Yes, steps are learned and progress can be made quickly, but the end goal is different. There is no final moment of achievement in ballet technique; it is a constant work in progress, and that is what makes it so special.

Professional ballet dancers take classes regularly for their entire careers.  For students and professionals alike, slower paced classes provide the opportunity to engage the correct muscles and use proper alignment.  Correct muscle engagement in slower-paced classes can help ensure that the same muscles are triggered when more complicated or faster steps and choreography are introduced.  Engaging the proper muscles also helps with injury prevention and sustainability.

The last thing to keep in mind is that there is always something to learn in ballet classes, even at the lowest level.  Always be open to hearing corrections and improving, even if you are not in the level you might wish to be in. If you have concerns or questions, reach out to your teacher and he/she can help guide you in the right direction.

Thank you,

Hannah

10/19/18
Hello, Ballet Families!

Just a few reminders about the requirements for the Ballet program:

Based on your placed ballet level, all dancers are required to be enrolled and attend a certain number of classes per week. Failure to meet these requirements puts the dancer in jeopardy of being moved down a level. Below are the requirements for the levels:

Level 1 dancers: enrolled in (1) 1 hour class per week

Level 2 dancers: enrolled in (1) 1/1.5 hour class per week

Level 3 dancers: enrolled in (2) 1.5 hour classes per week

Level 4 & 5 dancers: enrolled in (3) 1.5 hour classes per week. 1 hour of ballet (only the third class) can be substituted with a Body Conditioning & Skill Building class.

If a dancer wishes to progress further in ballet (move up in the levels), he/she should consider taking additional ballet classes or privates with one of the ballet instructors.

Attendance:

Consistent attendance in ballet class is essential for maintaining technique and skills, as well as endurance. Classes are structured to grow on a weekly basis, building upon the previous week to progress dancers through their technique at a steady pace. Dancers are not allowed to miss more than 3 of the same class per semester (Aug-Dec & Jan-May) without running the risk of being moved down a level. They can make-up missed classes within the same week to avoid the missed class being counted against your dancer.

Dress Code

GIRLS 6+

Color-coded leotards (dependent on ballet level), pink footed tights (worn underneath the leotard), and pink ballet shoes. Sports bras may be worn under the leotard as long as they are not distracting (ie, no decorative straps across the back, bright colors/designs).  A tan sports bra with clear straps is suggested to maintain the lines of the leotard. Alternately, a bra the same color and shade as the leo color may be worn.

Level 1 grape

Level 2 royal blue

Level 3 black cherry

Level 4 navy

Level 5 black

Dancers are to wear their level ballet color to all ballet classes, even if they are stepping into a mixed level class or a lower level class (as makeup/extra class). This helps the instructors to be aware of the level of each individual dancer in the class, enabling them to give each dancer the best class possible.

Hair: Should be worn in a clean and neat bun, taking care to ensure that dancer’s hair is out of the face/eyes, is secure and will not come undone in the middle of class.

Jewelry: Only stud earrings will be allowed; no other jewelry should be worn.

BOYS

White, fitted t-shirt with black leggings/joggers, white socks and black ballet shoes. Hair should be worn out of the face and eyes.

Dress Code Violations (including incorrect leotard color)

1st offense – Dancer will be allowed to take class but will be sent home with a note

2nd offense –  Dancer will be allowed to take class but will be sent home with a note, informing the parent(s) that the next violation will be marked as an absence.

3rd offense- Dancer will not be allowed to take class, and will be marked absent, but will still be asked to stay and observe class and take notes.

All violations will be tracked through their Studio Director account, and will reset at the beginning of each semester.

Pointe Work

We love that so many dancers are eager to advance to getting pointe shoes, but this can be a long process. The question we often get is, “what age do you get your pointe shoes?” Unfortunately, there is no magical age that all dancers are ready for pointe shoes. A much better question would be, “when will my dancer be ready for pointe shoes?”

Pointe work requires a dancer to be strong in their ballet technique, as well as mature enough to tackle the responsibility of pointe work. A dancer must be able to maintain their turnout consistently throughout ballet class and have proper alignment from head to toe. If a dancer does not have the strength to support their body en pointe, it can result in damage to the bones of the feet and legs. These bones do not finish developing until approximately 13-15 years old, while most dancers are ready for pointe work between the ages of 11-13. These ages are approximations and are not guaranteed for each dancer. The most essential part of beginning pointe work is making sure that the dancer has the strength and technique to support the dancer en pointe.

Once a dancer earns their pointe shoes, it is essential he/she works slowly and consistently in his/her pointe shoes. Pointe work is much more difficult than working in flat shoes, and dancers should not jump into full class with their pointe shoes; they need to learn how to articulate and work through their shoes first and foremost. Consistency is key; a dancer cannot gain strength and stamina en pointe without actively working in their shoes. There are exercises that can help with strengthening, but nothing compares to standing on your toes, like pointe work.

We ask that you all are patient with us as we prepare the younger dancers for pointe work with a strong technical foundation, and we encourage you to talk with your eager young dancers about this topic.

This is a slightly controversial topic, as there are differing views about what age a dancer is ready for pointe, but the consistent answer is there is no magic age, but that it has more to do with technique, body development and strength than age. We have attached a few articles that expand on this topic, that we think you all might enjoy.

https://dancer.com/ballet-info/in-the-studio/when-to-start-pointe/

https://www.dancespirit.com/am-i-ready-for-pointe-2326191492.html

https://www.childrenscolorado.org/conditions-and-advice/sports-articles/sports-safety/when-should-my-child-start-pointe-ballet/

http://www.rmaeug.com/whentogoenpointe.pdf